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Anxious gatekeeping

Analogous to nervous cluelessness is something we might call “anxious gatekeeping.”   This is desire to police the borders of poetry, or of...

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Do I Follow My Own Advice?

Sometimes.

Things often fall apart in unexpected ways. I don't follow every stupid motivational trick because I outthink myself and get too intelligent for my own good. I rationalize departures from best practice, or I simply fail to follow the path of maximal results. The blog is based on my own experience, what really has worked for me, but I'm sure I cling to habits that are not optimal. As I've argued here before, if you increase efficiency from 20% to 40% you will still get twice as much done, even if you aren't close to 100%. There is no point in beating yourself up if you think you're at 70. 70 is very, very good.

Ok. I despise sports analogies but here is one that might hold up: Hitting .300 in baseball if very, very good. Hitting .200 is marginal. So the entire differential between really solid hitters and bad ones is only 10%. Nobody hits 1000, or even over 400, and nobody hits below 200 and keeps their job very long. The real differences occur between bad (200), average (250), great (300), and extraordinary (350). So for most players it's going to be a matter of improving from 240 to 275, or from 290 to 304. Marginal differences but that in a fiercely competitive environment make a lot of difference.

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