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I wrote a contrafactum to rhythm changes today. Or I should say that one just occurred to the fingers of my right hand as I was playing, aft...

Saturday, October 2, 2010

An Editor is Always Happy to Help

Twice in the last week I have helped to prevent a calamity from befalling a colleague. One colleague was irritated and the other was infuriated to receive my editorial help, though they each requested it. Both will come out "smelling like a rose" (to use an expression my Dad has always loved and that I now love, too).

In my last couple of years in book publishing back in the early 1990s, I spent more than half of my time, it seemed, addressing legal matters: Making sure that my authors weren't going to get the company I worked for, Prometheus Books Inc., sued for defamation, libel, invasion of privacy, copyright infringement, and the like. Although I did not become an editor so that I could act as an ersatz lawyer, I did enjoy the role, especially because I got to talk to a REAL lawyer, and a great one, Stefan Bauer-Mengelberg, a lot. Stefan provided his services for free, because he liked the books we published. He was a wonderful and brilliant and eclectic man, who reached the highest levels of accomplishment as a musical conductor and mathematician and teacher before starting his career in Law. I didn't know he'd been a conductor until I called him regarding a lawsuit one afternoon. Leonard Bernstein had died the day before, and for some reason I brought that up with Stefan. "I was his assistant conductor for a year," he said. "This sounds more impressive than it was. My main job was to have a cigarette lit and ready for Lenny when he came offstage."

Back to my point: Because of Stefan Bauer-Mengelberg, many of my authors *didn't* besmirch their reputations and *didn't* get their butts sued. To a person, they were unhappy receiving the help they received, because they believed they didn't need it. They all asked: What could go wrong?

A calamity is smaller than a comma when it's born, and I am indifferent to gratitude.

(cross-posted at basil.ca)

2 comments:

Thomas said...

Many years ago I infuriated an author by pointing out that his ostensible "interpretations" of Hegel were in fact plagiarisms, from the German into English. So they looked like straight plagiarisms of the standard translations of Hegel.

Jonathan said...

No good deed goes unpunished, as they say. People are generally happy to have my editing help, though one dissertation student was not!