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Anxious gatekeeping

Analogous to nervous cluelessness is something we might call “anxious gatekeeping.”   This is desire to police the borders of poetry, or of...

Friday, February 28, 2014

March will be the exceptionalist month

... since that is the chapter that will be work on. Right now I am trying to track down a remark attributed to C.P. Snow that "all ancient traditions date from the second half of the 19th century." If you have the reference on hand please let me know.

4 comments:

Vance Maverick said...

http://crookedtimber.org/2006/03/08/the-invention-of-tradition-karate-edition/ -- Quiggin writes in comment 5:

DvB, having quoted this for ages, I’ve finally tracked it down. *The Masters* has an Appendix on the history of the colleges, which includes the line (p 309 in the Penguin edition):

“Nine English traditions out of ten, old Eustace Pilbrow used to say, date from the latter half of the nineteenth century” (Pilbrow is one of the college Fellows in the novel)

Jonathan said...

Thanks! I knew I got it from Quiggin, but didn't know he had tracked it down.

profacero said...

What a great quotation.

March is my exceptionalist month too.

Andrew Shields said...

That's a great line, indeed. It reminds me of the references to "ancient traditions" in Jim Jarmusch's "Ghost Dog." The criss-crossing of hiphop, the Mafia, Samurai, and children's books. And probably a few other things that aren't crossing my mind right now.