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Thursday, January 31, 2013

Eccentricity is the root of design

My inspiration is this course. It is not going to be a copy of this course, but I want to do a course that has a similar groove to it. Of course, a course like this has to lead to another book.


A. The idea. How bizarre or crazy ideas (from the mainstream perspective) try to erect themselves as culturally normative, as they never really can. This happens first in romanticism, with the sacralization of a poetic originality. Modernism wants to be culturally normative, or else ends up being that way. Romanticism cannot be normative like enlightenment thought can, because romanticism is both traditional and anti-traditional.

It is a critique of hypostatized modernism, estilo Octavio Paz. A kind of monumentalization of the modern.


B. The readings. Blake. Lorca. Eliot. Pound. Gadamer. Lezama Lima. Ginsberg. Bloom. Rothenberg. Bob Perelman's The Trouble with Genius. Ullán and his visual poetry.


C. The periods. Historical romanticism. Historical modernism. The 60s.

4 comments:

Leslie said...

The Brazilians fit in there.

Mário de Andrade (20s), monumentalizing or not?

Tropicalistas and poetas concretos (60s), monumentalizing or not?

Jonathan said...

Concrete poetry never excited me. There's something about its mimetic naiveté that bugs me. But that makes me think of including Ullán's visual poetry. His agrafismos are something I've written about and taught.

I'm not much of a Brazilianist, unfortunately. Tropicalismo fits into the 60s certainly.

Leslie said...

Yes, he / that mode are more interesting precisely because not monumentalizing (I am saying off the cuff, just invented that thought).

I do *not* like that 60s Brazilian stuff as art. And-but it is supposed to be non monmentalizing, but I think it is.

I'd like to get more into Mário de A., though ... and DUH he fits right into my present project design, so I guess there is nothing to stop me.

Leslie said...

Yes, he / that mode are more interesting precisely because not monumentalizing (I am saying off the cuff, just invented that thought).

I do *not* like that 60s Brazilian stuff as art. And-but it is supposed to be non monmentalizing, but I think it is.

I'd like to get more into Mário de A., though ... and DUH he fits right into my present project design, so I guess there is nothing to stop me.